Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016

I am very excited to announce that my new DirectAccess book, Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 from Apress media, is now shipping! The book is available on popular online sites like Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, Springer.com, Apress.com, and others. The book is also available in electronic formats such as Amazon Kindle and Barnes & Noble Nook, as well as a variety of subscription formats including Safari, Books24x7, and SpringerLink.

Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016

This book contains detailed and prescriptive guidance for the planning, design, implementation, and support of a DirectAccess remote access solution on Windows Server 2016. It also includes valuable insight, tips, tricks, and best practice recommendations gained from my many years of deploying DirectAccess for some of the largest organizations in the world.

Current DirectAccess administrators will also find this book helpful, as the majority of content is still applicable to DirectAccess in Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2. In addition, the book also includes essential information on the design and deployment of highly available and geographically redundant DirectAccess deployments.

Troubleshooting DirectAccess can be a daunting task, so I’ve dedicated an entire chapter in the book to this topic. For those responsible for the maintenance and support of DirectAccess in their organization, this chapter alone will be worth the investment.

Be sure to order your copy today!

Configuring Internal Load Balancing in Microsoft Azure

Configuring Internal Load Balancing in Microsoft AzureHave I mentioned I love using Microsoft Azure Infrastructure-as-a-Service? Perhaps once or twice. 🙂 Azure IaaS allows me to extend my on-premises test lab to the cloud and provide tremendous flexibility for some of the projects I’m working on. Occasionally I’ll have a need to create a load-balanced cluster of servers for testing, which on-premises can often easily be accomplished using the native Windows Network Load Balancing (NLB) feature. However, NLB isn’t supported in the cloud. Thankfully Microsoft recently added a load balancing feature in Azure to address this need. Read my latest article on CloudComputingAdmin.com to learn more!

Controlling Network Traffic Distribution with Microsoft Azure Traffic Manager

Controlling Network Traffic Distribution with Microsoft Azure Traffic Manager
I love Azure! There are so many great features included with the service it’s amazing. One of them I discovered recently is the Azure Traffic Manager. It provides intelligent and granular network traffic distribution using DNS. Essentially it is a cloud-based virtual Global Server Load Balancing (GSLB) solution. Easy to take advantage of and works for on-premises workloads too! Read my latest article on CloudComputingAdmin.com to learn more.

Reserved IP Address Options in Microsoft Azure

I’ve been working with Microsoft Azure a lot lately, utilizing their Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) virtual machines to extend my on-premises test lab and for a few other projects I’m working on too. Address assignment in Azure is dynamic, with services typically being accessed by hostname. There are times when having a static IP address is desirable, however. Microsoft Azure does have several options available to address this need. Read my latest article on CloudComputingAdmin.com to learn more.

Creating Custom Base Images in Microsoft Azure